Micro-Pulse Diode Cyclophotocoagulation

What is MicroPulse Transcleral Cyclophotocoagulation (TSCPC)?

TSCPC is a procedure that helps lower the pressure inside the eye.TSCPC uses a laser to disrupt some of the cells in the ciliary body that produce the fluid inside the eye. This fluid is called the aqueous humor. In glaucoma, the eye’s drain does not function properly. The fluid does not drain quickly and pressure measures higher than what the optic nerve can withstand. This damages the sensitive optic nerve causing slow vision loss. By using a laser to disrupt some of the cells that produce the eye’s fluid, the eye’s drain does not have to work as hard. This is because there is not as much fluid trying to drain.

How do I prepare for my MicroPulse TSCPC?

The operating room will call you 24 hours before your surgery to give you your surgical time. They will provide you with instructions about your medications. The nurse will go over any questions you may have. You will be told what time to stop eating and drinking to prepare for surgery. You cannot drive for 24 hours after surgery because of the anesthesia you will receive during surgery. Be sure to arrange a responsible adult to come with you, stay during surgery, and go back home with you.

What should I expect on the day of my contact transcleral laser cyclophotocoagulation?

On the day of your laser treatment, you will arrive at the American Surgery Center of South Texas. You will meet your nurses and anesthesiologist at the surgery center. You will have an IV placed so that you can receive relaxing medications and pain medications during the surgery. We will take you back to the operating room and lie you down flat. The anesthesiologist will give you mediation that will put you asleep for a few minutes. While asleep, Dr. Jones will numb your eye by giving you a shot next to your eye. Dr. Jones will use a laser that is about the size of a pen to treat some of the cells of the ciliary body that produces aqueous humor (the fluid inside the eye).

What are the risks of TSCPC?

With any procedure, there are risks and a chance of a complication. The most common complication is that the pressure is not lowered enough from the laser treatment. In this case, the laser treatment may need to be repeated or other medications or surgery may be required to get the pressure under control. Another common issue is pain after the procedure. You can take over the counter Tylenol (acetaminophen) or Motrin (ibuprofen) if you are not sensitive or allergic. If those over the counter medications do not help, you will be prescribed anti-inflammatory drops. These drops can be used 3-4 times per day to help with pain. In rare instances, the pressure can drop too much leading to a reduction in vision, loss of vision, or even loss of the eye. You could develop a cataract which could cause a decrease in vision (however, cataracts can be removed if they start to obstruct your vision). With advancements in the laser technology used to perform this procedure, the risk of complications have become much less.

 

Please watch the following video about this minimally-invasive glaucoma laser procedure:


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